Outer Order, Inner Calm:

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NEW YORK TIMES BESTSELLER • In this lovely, easy-to-use illustrated guide to decluttering, the beloved author of The Happiness Project shows us how to take control of our stuff—and, by extension, our lives.
 
Gretchen Rubin knows firsthand that creating order can make our lives happier, healthier, more productive, and more creative. But for most of us, a rigid, one-size-fits-all solution doesn’t work. When we tailor our approach to suit our own particular challenges and habits, we can find inner calm.
 
With a sense of fun, and a clear idea of what’s realistic for most people, Rubin suggests dozens of manageable tips and tricks for creating a more serene, orderly environment, including:
 
• Never label anything “miscellaneous.”
• Ask yourself, “Do I need more than one?”
• Don’t aim for minimalism.
• Remember: If you can’t retrieve it, you won’t use it.
• Stay current with a child’s interests.
• Beware the urge to “procrasticlear.”
 
By getting rid of things we don’t use, don’t need, or don’t love, we free our minds (and our shelves) for what we truly value.


From the Publisher

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Outer Order, Inner Calm by Gretchen Rubin

outer order inner calm;Gretchen Rubin;tidying up;minimalist;happiness project;cleaning;spring clean

outer order inner calm;Gretchen Rubin;tidying up;minimalist;happiness project;cleaning;spring clean

outer order inner calm;Gretchen Rubin;tidying up;minimalist;happiness project;cleaning;spring clean

outer order inner calm;Gretchen Rubin;tidying up;minimalist;happiness project;cleaning;spring clean

outer order inner calm;Gretchen Rubin;tidying up;minimalist;happiness project;cleaning;spring clean

outer order inner calm;Gretchen Rubin;tidying up;minimalist;happiness project;cleaning;spring clean

Outer Order, Inner Calm: Declutter and Organize to Make More Room for Happiness

outer order inner calm;Gretchen Rubin;tidying up;minimalist;happiness project;cleaning;spring clean

outer order inner calm;Gretchen Rubin;tidying up;minimalist;happiness project;cleaning;spring clean

outer order inner calm;Gretchen Rubin;tidying up;minimalist;happiness project;cleaning;spring clean

outer order inner calm;Gretchen Rubin;tidying up;minimalist;happiness project;cleaning;spring clean

outer order inner calm;Gretchen Rubin;tidying up;minimalist;happiness project;cleaning;spring clean

outer order inner calm;Gretchen Rubin;tidying up;minimalist;happiness project;cleaning;spring clean

outer order inner calm;Gretchen Rubin;tidying up;minimalist;happiness project;cleaning;spring clean

outer order inner calm;Gretchen Rubin;tidying up;minimalist;happiness project;cleaning;spring clean

Consider The Three Big Questions Of Clutter

When trying to decide the fate of a possession, ask yourself:

Do I need it?

Do I love it?

Do I use it?

Identify The Problem

Make your workspace more convenient and orderly by taking the time to identify a specific problem.

Is your coat or sweater always in your way? Get a coat rack, use the common closet, or get a hook

Are you constantly getting tangled in your headphones? Get a desk headphone hanger.

Do you constantly misplace paper with important information? Use a cork board, take notes in a single notebook, create an in-box for ‘current vital info,’ use a vertical file holder to keep papers organized with within reach.

Many problems have simple solutions—once we take a moment to identify them.

Remind Yourself, ‘I Have Plenty Of Room For The Things That Are Important To Me.’

The point of cultivating habits for continuous clutter-clearing isn’t to achieve some particular level of perfection. It’s to create an environment where we can feel, ‘I have plenty of room for the things that are important to me. I can find those things, I can see them, and if something new comes into my life, I have room to expand.’

Everything Looks Better Arranged On A Tray

Perfume bottles. Spice jars. Cuff links. Enamel boxes. Coffee-making materials.

A tray (or a basket, bowl, or plate) pulls individual items into a pleasing collection.

Even when things are in the right place, they may look messy and scattered until they’re contained in some way.

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